Second glazing

Following on from my single firing post – where the glazed greenware came out in one piece, but the glaze hadn’t been quite as dynamic as I had hoped… I re-glazed everything and fired again!

In order for the glaze to take well I heated the mugs/bowls etc using a hair dryer and added thin layers of extra glaze, two extra coats in total. I also added an extra stripe of green or blue as the best interaction was between the indigo float and seaweed.

I don’t think the toasted sage Amaco Potters Choice glaze is a great one for encouraging movement and interaction between the two glazes, in the same way the tenmoku glaze is, but nonetheless I am much happier with the results so I thought I’d share a couple of before and after photos!

Here is an example of the mug, with an added stripe of blue:

And this is the bowl!

I like the green seaweed and the indigo float, but I want to find a better base for the two of them. The range seems to focus on darker under coats, which wasn’t what I was after. The only other lighter colour seems to be oatmeal which is quite yellow-y from the picture.

Actually the toasted sage comes out quite grey as the photos show, which in of itself is a lovely tone but wasn’t as light as I’d hoped it to be. But at least now I know I have a nice grey glaze – so every cloud has a silver (toasted sage!) lining!

A couple more things using this glaze combination and tenmoku in my etsy shop – check it out!

PS xx

Throwing and Kiln shelf issues!

During the week I very nearly signed up to an intensive throwing class… it was far away and expensive. But I really want to improve my throwing. However money is tight at the moment and so rather than spend the time and money going somewhere else, I thought I should try and have a good few sessions at home! I was hoping that the sun would be out and I’d be able to save the mess in the house by throwing outside… but no. It’s rained on and off all weekend.

Nonetheless! I got my little table top Shimpo out of the toilet in the garden and cut out about 8-10 chunks of 500g clay, and two 750 chunks. I wanted to throw some mugs and a couple of bowls.

Throwing, unlike previous times, went well! I’ve really tried to put into practice what I have been told and seen online on youtube and Instagram. Gus the Pothead is one of my favourites on Instagram, I’d definitely recommend checking out his throwing videos!

I managed to make eight mugs about the same shape and size. I wired them off and then let them dry a little on the bat. I think I might be going wrong here – should I be taking them off the bat straight away? Two got damaged when I was trying to take them off so I let them dry a little. Any advice on taking things off the bat would be appreciated! What works for you?

I threw two more mugs and then my bowls suffered a similar fate as the two mugs – they completely collapsed as I was trying to take them off the bat. It was so frustrating! I finally managed to throw another large bowl and keep it. But I did as I described earlier, I wired it off and let it dry out a little before moving it off the bat.

My plan is to glaze at greenware stage with Amaco Potters Choice and do a single firing. However herein lies my next issue. My kiln shelves are flaking! The bat wash flakes off and falls onto a pot. How do I stop this happening? Does bat wash come off with water or do I need to do something else to remove it all? I read perhaps a very thin coat is better than a thick one… Please! I don’t want to ruin the cups and bowl I’ve thrown this weekend. And as SB’s studio is closed I don’t have another kiln to use!

Love in advance

PS xxx

Coiling (& Raku preparation)!

Apologies for the long delay in posts, life has gotten extremely busy. Working full time and taking care of a family doesn’t leave much time for anything else. Access to SB’s studio has been on and off as well due to similar circumstances. However the last week or so has seen some pottery action!

We are doing a raku firing in about a week, which meant making a couple of pieces early enough to have them bisque fired, glazed and dry enough in good time!

I have grown in confidence in my slab building however coiling is probably my weakest skill. Therefore I decided to take the opportunity to try and get better at coiling whilst preparing some items for a raku firing – two birds; one stone!

I don’t know about you, but I struggle to keep a coherent shape when coiling. Perhaps I’m working with the clay too wet? Should I be waiting until the clay is drier before coiling? The pot seems to sag and lose shape. Getting the sides smooth inside and out is tricky too. Perhaps my coils are too thin as well.. Any tips or advice would be great!

I read in Clay Craft about using a former to begin the piece and then to coil on top of this. This was more successful, but still not easy!

Nonetheless I created a few items – a coiled bottle, two coiled bowls using a former for the base and then an orb using two pieces shaped using the former. I shaped one of the bowls into a triangular shape just to mix things up a bit!

SB had created about six or seven glazes for the firing. I dipped items, used tape to keep parts of the clay clean, brushed on glaze and dripped it to create movement! Hopefully this will mean I get a lot of contrast between the colourful glazed areas and the naked clay, which will go black in the firing. Plunging the hot pieces into a bin of sawdust and paper will also affect the colours, so I will consider how to create as much reduction as possible before the big day!

I’m afraid I don’t have a picture of the glazed items, but we’re doing the raku firing on the 22nd July so I’ll take as many photos as possible.

SB’s studio is now closed for the summer but I bought a new bag of clay, so I’m hoping to get back to throwing and building more regularly over the next few weeks – and blogging of course!!

As ever, keep up to date with my comings and goings on Instagram and keep an eye on my etsy page for some lovely things!

P Stratford xx